DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

ADDITIONAL MAJOR and LICENSURE PROGRAMS IN EDUCATION

The Department of Education offers various programs of study to complete an additional
major in Education, with options for pursuit of Judaic Studies Licensure for Secondary
Education (6-12), Hebrew Teacher Licensure for K-8 and/or Illinois State Licensure in
Elementary and/or Special Education (LBS I). The programs are aligned with the Illinois
Professional Teaching Standards and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher
Education Standards (NCATE), and provide for the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and
dispositions necessary for effective performance in various teaching roles.

The programs have been carefully designed to provide a set of interrelated learning and
clinical experiences that will develop and enhance those abilities that are necessary to
become a qualified educator in public and private schools. Teacher candidates may pursue
Illinois State Teacher Licensure in Elementary or Special Education (LBS I) through
comprehensive training in challenging sequences of curricula. The Elementary Education
and Special Education programs have been approved by the Illinois State Board of
Education. Licensure titles and requirements are subject to change by the Illinois State
Board of Education. For the most current information, check with the Department of
Education.

At present, a major in Education is only offered to students in the Blitstein Institute.
Mission of the Department of Education

The mission of the Department of Education of Hebrew Theological College is to prepare
teachers who are critical thinkers, effective communicators, proactive educators, and moral
practitioners who possess the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to help all students
succeed. Furthermore, the mission of the department is to provide the highest quality
preparation for teacher candidates to enable them to reach their fullest potential as
professional educators, and to instill in them a lifelong love of learning and desire for
knowledge.

Candidates in the initial Licensure programs at Hebrew Theological College receive a strong
foundation in liberal arts and sciences, as well as Judaic studies that emphasize moral and
ethical standards, dispositions, and commitments. These include appropriate professional
conduct; respect for instructors, colleagues, students, and parents; sensitivity to individual
differences and diversity; and the importance of “Gemilut Chasadim and Tikun Olam,”
deeds and service that will improve the community and the world.

Core Values of the Department of Education

The core values of the Department of Education are aligned with the core values of the
institution, and are reflected in the Hebrew phrase and motto:

Li’lmod, L’lamed, Li’shmor, V’la’asot
“To Learn, To Teach, To Observe, and To Do”

Li’lmod – To Learn: Similar to the institutional core value, Love of Learning, the faculty of
the Department of Education values learning as a lifelong pursuit, and attempts to model
and instill this value in the candidates. The faculty models scholarship and the pursuit of
excellence, which the candidates are expected to emulate. Candidates are encouraged to join
professional organizations and to pursue ongoing professional development opportunities
after graduation. Candidates also engage in learning as critical thinkers and effective
communicators.

L’lamed – To Teach: This core value reflects the essence of the Department of Education,
to prepare educators with the knowledge, skills and dispositions to be effective instructors
and agents of positive change for their students. At the foundation of this value is the
concept of the candidate as a proactive educator, who can apply theory to practice,
differentiate instruction, and integrate technology to meet the needs of a diverse student
population. Furthermore, this vale encompasses the concept of the candidate as a moral
practitioner, who demonstrates mutual respect and integrity.

Li’shmor – To Observe and Reflect: Clinical experience and reflection are the basis of this
value. Candidates must learn to be thoughtful observers and reflective practitioners in order
to glean information about their students’ abilities and needs. Candidates must demonstrate
the ability to use their observations and reflections to improve their teaching and enhance
student learning. This value reflects a pursuit of excellence in the art of teaching, and is a
skill that requires critical thinking and effective communication for the proactive educator
and moral practitioner.

V’La’asot – To Do: This core value reflects the Department of Education’s commitment to
service, not only within the schools but within the greater community as well. The faculty of
the Department of Education is involved in a variety of service projects in the community,
which models the importance of service to the candidates. The value of service is instilled in
the candidates so that they see themselves as part of the greater good, with the potential of
improving life for others. The candidate as a critical thinker, effective communicator,
proactive educator, and moral practitioner is energized by this “call to action” in the pursuit
of excellence and integrity.

Department of Education – Philosophy
The Department of Education faculty, in cooperation with the professional community and
education candidates, developed a philosophy of teacher education which is the basis of the
conceptual framework. The philosophy is predicated on theoretical constructs, research, and
knowledge of best practices as well as State standards. The beliefs contained therein
permeate the curriculum and are reflected in the elementary and special education programs
of HTC. The philosophy, which is consistent with the mission of the College as a whole,
articulates the knowledge, skills and dispositions expected of a graduate of the Teacher
Education Programs of Hebrew Theological College.

The philosophy is comprised of four major components: Hebrew Theological College
prepares teachers who will be Critical Thinkers, Effective Communicators, Proactive
Educators, and Moral Practitioners.

As Critical Thinkers, candidates analyze, evaluate, and synthesize information; use creative
and diverse ways, including technology, to generate hypotheses, solve problems, ask and
answer questions; use multiple perspectives in problem solving; tolerate ambiguity, and
demonstrate flexibility. Furthermore, as critical thinkers candidates use self-evaluation and
reflection to recognize preconceptions, biases, and value judgments.

As Effective Communicators, candidates clearly express themselves in spoken (or sign)
language and written communication, or use technology and augmentative communication
systems appropriately; adjust style and vocabulary of spoken and written communication in
accordance with the needs and comprehension skills of the intended audience. Furthermore,
the Effective Communicator is aware of and sensitive to multicultural aspects and individual
differences in oral and written communication, particularly to the varying social meanings
attached to tone, gesture, and voice.

As Proactive Educators, candidates understand the physiological, psychological, social and
cultural factors that affect behavior; develop and uses a repertoire of corrective and reactive
techniques for classroom management; create an enriched, stimulating, activity-oriented
learning environment where students can be successful and self-esteem is fostered. In
addition, proactive educators make use of physical arrangements of the environment,
differentiated instruction, technology, adaptation of the curriculum and individualization to
help students monitor and control their behavior. They clearly express realistic expectations,
set appropriate goals, use consistent scheduling, and continuously monitor student
performance to help students achieve success.

As Moral Practitioners, candidates respect cultural diversity, individual differences, and
recognize universal principles of fairness, the integrity and value of the individual, and the
interconnectedness of all peoples. The Moral Practitioner is sensitive to moral issues and
situations; shows respect for students, colleagues, instructors, and supervisors; judges others
favorably, and teaches others to give the benefit of the doubt; and uses principles of fairness
and flexibility in conflict resolution. Furthermore, the Moral Practitioner is a mentor and
advocate for students as well as an enthusiastic conveyor of knowledge. Finally, the moral
practitioner is a “mensch”

Department of Education – Knowledge, Skills, and Dispositions

Knowledge
Candidates in the Department of Education are expected to demonstrate knowledge and
proficiency in liberal arts and sciences, Judaic studies, content areas in which they will be
certified to teach, as well as pedagogical and professional areas.

A rigorous curriculum in Liberal Arts and Sciences and Judaic studies provides a foundation
upon which candidates can develop and expand critical thinking skills.
Challenging courses in written and oral communication enable candidates to meet
institutional standards and become effective communicators.
Candidates acquire knowledge of child and cognitive development, learning theory,
diversity, individual differences and special needs through a core of education courses and
field experiences. In addition, candidates must develop an awareness and understanding of
the Illinois Learning Standards and Professional Teaching Standards. Methods courses,
clinical experiences, and student teaching allow candidates to develop research-based
pedagogical and professional knowledge as well as an understanding of best educational
practices as they become proactive educators.

The values, dispositions, and commitments modeled by the faculty, administration, and
cooperating teachers, which candidates are expected to demonstrate and reflect on, facilitate
the development of the candidate as a moral practitioner. Finally, candidates must possess
knowledge of current technologies that can be used to enhance student learning.

Skills
Candidates in the Department of Education are expected to demonstrate effective planning,
teaching, assessment and classroom management skills that facilitate learning for diverse
student populations.

As Critical Thinkers, candidates must demonstrate that they can reflect on their students’
strengths and weaknesses and adjust their teaching style, strategies, and methods
accordingly. Candidates must be able to analyze significant factors in the learning
environment pertaining to student learning, and design reasonable solutions. Candidates
must show that they can develop meaningful activities to illustrate concepts and uses a
variety of approaches to assist the learning process.
As Effective Communicators, candidates must demonstrate appropriate interactive
discussion skills with colleagues, parents, and students as well as clarity of focus, effective
language, presentation techniques, and presence. Furthermore, candidates are expected to
demonstrate proficiency in writing, using cohesive prose that has clarity of focus, sense of
audience, correct syntax and appropriate vocabulary.
As Proactive Educators, candidates must demonstrate the ability to plan and implement
differentiated instruction and assessments and to use data and feedback to modify and
improve their teaching. Proactive educators use a variety of teaching methods and materials
and integrate technology to enhance student learning. Candidates must also demonstrate
effective classroom management skills with a repertoire of proactive, positive techniques
and appropriate corrective strategies.
As Moral Practitioners, candidates must demonstrate a sensitivity to and respect for diverse
populations. They must treat parents, students, colleagues, and supervisors with courtesy
and respect. Candidates teach students responsibility and standards of interpersonal conduct.
Candidates must maintain the confidentiality of students and families. Moral practitioners 32
are expected to behave in a professional manner that is consistent with the educational
message being conveyed, and to model the dispositions articulated by the Department of
Education.

Dispositions
The faculty of the Department of Education in cooperation with the professional
community, teachers and administrators in clinical placements, have articulated a set of
dispositions that are expected of all candidates, faculty, and professional staff. These
dispositions, which relate to the core values and mission of the Department of Education,
include: Integrity, Initiative, Insight, Fairness, Flexibility, Professionalism, Enthusiasm, and
Respect. These dispositions are defined as follows:

Integrity: Integrity is crucial to the development of a moral practitioner. The candidate
behaves in a manner that demonstrates adherence to moral and ethical principles;
soundness of moral character, and honesty. The candidate is concerned about social
responsibility, equal opportunity, and the social, political, and environmental
consequences of an individual’s behavior. The candidate is dependable, trustworthy
and honors commitments to others.

Initiative: Initiative requires critical thinking, effective communication, and is
necessary for the development of a proactive educator. The candidate takes
responsibility to help all students learn by creating and implementing effective
differentiated lesson plans and implementing proactive classroom management
procedures. The candidate demonstrates the ability to begin and/or to follow through
energetically with a plan or task, and can communicate this plan to others. The
candidate approaches new tasks in a logical, strategic manner, with a sense of
enterprise and determination. Furthermore, the candidate takes the initiative to learn
about the students outside of the constraints of the classroom, and to communicate with
parents regarding student progress and needs. The candidate sees the value of all
children, and is committed to helping all students succeed. The candidate seeks advice
and input from colleagues, instructors, and supervisors as needed.

Insight: Insight also requires critical thinking and effective communication, and is
necessary for the development of the candidate as a proactive educator and moral
practitioner. The candidate applies knowledge of child development, learning theory,
diversity, and individual differences to help all students succeed. The candidate is
willing to “think out of the box” to address learning needs and behavior issues. The
candidate considers the motivational factors and communicative function of various
behaviors and uses this insight to develop meaningful interventions. The candidate
views the student in a holistic manner and focuses on the positives in each student. The
candidate is also insightful regarding the candidate’s own performance, and uses
reflection for self-improvement.

Fairness: Fairness is significant for the moral practitioner and proactive educator, and
requires critical thinking and effective communication. Candidates demonstrate
fairness by ensuring that each student receives what he or she needs in order to be
successful rather than equating fairness with a “one size fits all” approach to teaching
and learning. The candidate establishes positive and trusting relationships with students
and parents, maintains open channels of communication, and refrains from bias. The
candidate considers and analyzes multiple perspectives. The candidate uses principles
of fairness and flexibility in conflict resolution, judges favorably, and teaches others to 33
give the benefit of the doubt. Furthermore, the candidate applies principles of fairness
in preparing lessons and assessments that address diverse student learning styles and
needs. The candidate serves as an empathetic and supportive mentor to the students.

Flexibility: Flexibility requires critical thinking, effective communication, and is
necessary for the development of a proactive educator. The candidate is responsive to
change and adaptable. The candidate considers and analyzes the significance of
unexpected events, and effectively communicates these changes to the students. The
candidate can recognize a “teachable moment” and divert from a planned format to
take advantage of a learning opportunity. The candidate uses multiple perspectives in
problem solving. As a moral practitioner, the candidate acknowledges that students’
and colleagues’ opinions and ideas may differ from the candidate’s own, and
demonstrates openness to their perspectives.

Professionalism: The candidate recognizes the importance of professional conduct in
education, and behaves in a manner that is consistent with the expectations of a
proactive educator and moral practitioner. The candidate dresses appropriately and is
well-groomed. The candidate takes all responsibilities seriously, is reliable, punctual
and has excellent attendance. The candidate is organized, plans lessons and activities in
advance, and is consistently prepared to teach. The candidate maintains the
confidentiality of students and families, but understands the situations under which
confidentiality cannot be protected, such as in cases of abuse, and follows through with
appropriate interventions and resources. The candidate refrains from gossip and avoids
becoming involved in workplace politics. The candidate collaborates with others, seeks
advice as needed, and is a contributing member of an educational team. The candidate
demonstrates collegiality and appropriate interpersonal skills.

Enthusiasm: Enthusiasm is an important disposition for the proactive educator. The
candidate demonstrates enthusiasm for the subject matter being taught and generates an
excitement for learning in the students. The candidate brings a sense of energy to the
classroom and uses a variety of creative learning experiences. The candidate has a
passion for teaching and vision for the potential of all students. The candidate strives to
help students develop self confidence and self esteem, and to view themselves as
valuable members of the learning community.

Respect: As a critical thinker, effective communicator, proactive educator, and moral
practitioner, the candidate must consistently maintain and demonstrate a sense of
respect for self and others. The candidate thinks critically and reflectively about self
and others and our interdependence. The candidate respects cultural diversity and
recognizes universal principles of justice, the integrity and value of the individual, and
the interconnectedness of all peoples. The candidate shows respect for students,
parents, colleagues, instructors, and supervisors through appropriate conduct and
communication. The candidate is courteous, polite, and friendly to others.

Goals and Outcomes
The goals of the conceptual framework are aligned with the mission, philosophy, and core
values of the Department of Education, and are illustrated in the outcomes that describe the
model of the candidate as a critical thinker, effective communicator, proactive educator, and
moral practitioner.

Goal 1: To prepare candidates who possess content knowledge in Judaic studies and liberal
arts and sciences to develop critical thinking and effective communication skills.

Knowledge Outcomes:

  • Candidates demonstrate proficiencies in spoken (or sign) language and written
    communication, or uses augmentative communication systems appropriately if needed.
  • Candidates understand and are adept at using a process approach to written language,
    including prewriting, drafts, and revisions.
  • Candidates research, organize, and deliver oral presentations.
  • Candidates are critical and analytical thinkers and problem solvers, and can apply these
    skills to the content areas (i.e.: Literature, History, Political Science, Mathematics,
    Behavioral Science, and Natural Science).


Goal 2: To prepare candidates who have knowledge of human development, learning theory,
and pedagogy that is research based and reflect current and best practices.

Knowledge Outcomes:

  • Candidates understand the course of typical and atypical child development and the
    learning process.
  • Candidates understand methodology that will lead to the development of their abilities
    to select and utilize curriculum, differentiate instruction, and adapt educational
    materials to meet the needs of diverse learners.
  • Candidates understand the physiological, psychological, social and cultural factors that
    affect learning and behavior.
  • Candidates are knowledgeable of current school law, including IDEA, the legal
    foundations of public education; issues of responsibility and accountability; first
    amendment rights; student discipline; school records; and student and parental rights.
  • Candidates are knowledgeable of current trends in elementary and special education,
    and can thoughtfully evaluate and critique these trends.
  • Candidates are aware of and proficient with current technologies including those that
    can be used to enhance learning for all students.

Goal 3: To prepare candidates who demonstrate effective teaching skills and proactive
classroom management to meet the needs of diverse learners.

Skills Outcomes:

  • Candidates prepare and deliver differentiated instruction designed to meet the needs of
    diverse learners.
  • Candidates use a variety of assessment techniques to measure student learning.
  • Candidates use data from assessments, observations, and reflections to inform and
    improve their teaching practice.
  • Candidates clearly express realistic expectations for student behavior and learning, set
    appropriate goals, use consistent scheduling, and continuously monitor student
    performance to help the student achieve success.
  • Candidates apply proactive behavior management strategies to create a safe and
    encouraging learning community.


Goal 4: To prepare candidates who demonstrate the dispositions consistent with being a
moral practitioner.

Dispositions Outcomes:

  • Candidates demonstrate integrity in their personal and professional conduct by
    adhering to moral and ethical principles, honesty, trustworthiness, and dependability.
  • Candidates take the initiative to learn about the students and prepare effective,
    differentiated lessons to meet their diverse needs. Candidates take the initiative to
    collaborate with others and ask for help when needed.
  • Candidates are insightful with regard to analyzing student learning, interpreting
    behavior, and reflecting on their own practice.
  • Candidates demonstrate a sense of fairness in teaching, assessment, classroom
    management, and interpersonal interactions.
  • Candidates are flexible, responsive to change, and can use teachable moments.
  • Candidates demonstrate professional conduct.
  • Candidates are enthusiastic about the subject matter and instill a sense of excitement
    for learning in their students.
  • Candidates show respect for the students, parents, colleagues, and supervisors.


Goal 5: To prepare candidates who can meet the needs of diverse student populations.

Diversity Outcomes

  • Candidates are sensitive to, understand and can plan for the needs of diverse students.
  • Candidates design and implement meaningful, differentiated learning experiences in
    multicultural settings.
  • Candidates see the value of all individuals, and are committed to helping all students
    succeed.

Goal 6: To prepare candidates who are proficient in the use of technology, and can integrate
technology into instruction to facilitate and enhance student learning.

Technology Outcomes

  • Candidates use technologies such as Livetext, Teamboard, and the Internet to enhance
    their own learning and teaching.
  • Candidates use technology to monitor student progress.
  • Candidates use technology for research, reflection, and communication.
  • Candidates integrate and apply technology in their instruction to enhance student
    learning.


Goal 7: To prepare candidates who are reflective practitioners.

  • Candidates reflect on their clinical experiences and use the reflection to identify areas
    of personal strengths and weaknesses.
  • Candidates reflect on their teaching performance and use the reflection to inform and
    improve their practice.


Goal 8: To prepare candidates who are lifelong learners and provide service to the
community.

  • Candidates recognize the need for and participate in ongoing personal and professional
    development opportunities.
  • Candidates perceive themselves as lifelong learners.
  • Candidates engage in service projects beyond the constraints of the classroom.

Program Structure
To achieve these goals, the Department of Education of Hebrew Theological College
provides four levels of study:

Judaic Studies: Consistent with the mission and policies of Hebrew Theological College, all
degree-seeking students pursuing a major in Education must complete the requirements for a
primary major in an area of Judaic Studies. Any student not progressing satisfactorily (see
Academic Progress Policy, on page 88 of the 2011 – 2013 Academic Catalog) in the Judaic
Studies major will not be permitted to continue in the additional major program.

General Education: The education programs prepare students to be proficient in all aspects
of liberal arts and sciences as well as professional education. Therefore, students wishing to
a complete a Licensure program in education must successfully pass a comprehensive
curriculum in the liberal arts and sciences that lead to standards-based competencies in
English composition and literature; mathematics; history; philosophy; natural science;
behavioral science; speech; and art.

Professional Studies: The teacher preparation programs at Hebrew Theological College
provide for the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for effective
performance in a variety of educational settings, and allow the students to respond
effectively to changing needs in the public and private schools. The programs, which
combine the development and acquisition of pragmatic teaching skills with the application
of sound pedagogical principles, prepare the students to assume a variety of roles in the field
of education.

Professional courses in education provide for the integration of the theoretical with the
practical. Courses include a professional education core which emphasizes differentiated
pedagogy, diverse learning styles, integration of educational technology, and school law. All
education majors must complete structured, comprehensive clinical experiences prior to
student teaching. Clinical experiences reflect increasing levels of student involvement,
ranging from observation, individual instruction, small group instruction, to student
teaching. In addition, pre-practicum internships provide opportunities to relate theory to
practice, develop skills, and practice the art of teaching.

Student Teaching and Practicum (Special Education): Student Teaching and Practicum are
the capstone experiences in the Department of Education for students seeking HTC Teacher
Licensure and/or Illinois State Teacher Licensure by entitlement in Elementary and Special
Education. The fifteen-week full-time Practica provide for the integration of theory and
practice; the implementation of pedagogical strategies; practice in the use of positive
programming and proactive behavior/classroom management; differentiation,
individualization and adaptation of curricula; teaching experience in diverse settings,
including teaching students with special needs.

Student Teaching and Practica are conducted in an approved clinical site under the guidance
and supervision of a cooperating teacher with demonstrated expertise in the field. The
student teacher will be observed by the course instructor and participate in feedback
sessions three to five times per semester. In addition, student teachers participate in
seminars that provide support and address topical issues in education.

Admission to the Department Of Education
Students pursuing Licensure through one or more of the teacher education programs or
those taking education courses to complete a thirty hour requirement for an additional major
must make formal application to the Department of Education. Admission to the
Department of Education is a prerequisite to enrollment in Level II core curriculum courses.
Applications are completed online on LiveText. Students contemplating declaration of an
additional major in Education should begin the application process prior to completing
Level I core courses. Transfer students must have completed 12 semester hours at Hebrew
Theological College before applying. Applicants must meet the following minimum
requirements for admission to the Department of Education:

  • A cumulative grade point average of 3.00 (based on a 4.00 scale) or higher at the time
    of application.
  • Candidates are required to have a current medical form with TB test, and
    fingerprint/background check on file prior to conducting clinical experiences, student
    teaching, or practicum.
  • Proficiency in oral English language as evidenced by a grade of "B" in an approved
    speech course, or by passing the Oral Proficiency Examination offered by the
    Department of Education.
  • Competency in written English as evidenced by a grade of "B" or higher in an
    approved writing course.
  • Competency in reading as evidenced by a grade of "B" or higher in an approved
    Literature course, or by passing the Vocabulary and Comprehension sections of the
  • Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE).
  • Competency in mathematics as evidenced by a grade of "B" or higher in MATH 104 or
    above.
  • Competency in basic computer skills including: word processing, spreadsheet,
    database, e-mail and use of the Internet, or completion of an approved computer course
    or successful completion of CAIS 106.
  • Two letters of recommendation from HTC instructors.
  • An interview with the Chairman (or designee) of the Department of Education.
  • Successful completion of Test of Academic Proficiency (TAP). ACT/SAT scores may
    be used in lieu of the TAP. The minimum allowable composite score for the ACT
    Plus Writing is 22 and the minimum allowable composite score for SAT is 1030
    (mathematics and critical reading).
  • Meets Departmental standards for initial dispositions evaluations.


Applicants for admission to the Department of Education who do not meet all of the
aforementioned criteria must schedule an appointment for an interview with the Department
of Education Admissions Committee for consideration. Depending on the circumstances,
provisional acceptance may be granted with a plan of remediation. Upon successful
completion of this plan the student may receive full admission. Each candidate must be
fully admitted to the program at least ONE semester before student teaching.

Program Options

  • Students in the Department of Education have four options with regard to their major in
    education.
  • Students may pursue a Bachelor of Arts with a thirty (30) hour additional major in 
    Education. 
  • Students may pursue a Bachelor of Arts, an additional major in Education and HTC 
    Judaic Studies Certificate for Secondary Education or HTC Hebrew Teacher Certificate 
    K-8. 
  • Students may pursue a Bachelor of Arts, an additional major in Education and 
    complete the requirements for Illinois State Teaching Licensure in Elementary 
    Education. 
  • Students may pursue a Bachelor of Arts, an additional major in Education and 
    complete the requirements for Illinois State Teaching Licensure in Special Education 
    (Learning/Behavior Specialist I). 


For further information, see the Department of Education Guidebook.


Advising

All students who wish to take ANY education course must meet with the Chairman of the
Department of Education and the Clinical Experiences Coordinator for advising prior to
registration. No student will be permitted to register for education courses without both the
Chairman and Coorinator’s signatures on the registration form.

Curriculum Requirements: Additional Major in Education

A minimum of 120 semester hours are required for all students who graduate from Hebrew
Theological College with a Bachelor of Arts degree. Students pursuing an additional major
in Education must complete 30 semester hours in the Department of Education. Specific
coursework is determined with the student's career goals in mind during the advising
process. All Education majors must complete at least 20 semester hours in professional
preparation coursework in residence including methodology coursework. Student Teaching
and Practicum must be completed in residence.

Curriculum Requirements: HTC Judaic Studies Certificate for Secondary Education
(6-12)

Hebrew Theological College offers a comprehensive curriculum designed to prepare and
train students to become professionally competent, culturally equipped and religiously
inspired teachers in Jewish Day Schools (Middle School), High Schools, and Supplementary
Schools (Talmud Torahs). Upon completion of the program, candidates will receive a
certificate from Hebrew Theological College that will entitle them to teach Judaic Studies
from 6th through 12th
grade.

The program is comprised of six components:

Advanced Hebrew Studies (AHS) Core 30 – 36 credits:
Judaic Studies: 12 credits in Bible; 12 credits in Hebrew; 6 credits in Jewish Law
(exemption for majors in Talmud); 6 credits in Jewish Philosophy; 6 credits in Jewish
History.
Major: Minimum of 30 credits in Bible or Jewish History.
Liberal Arts and Sciences as required for BA including:
English Composition: ENGL 111 and 211 (6 credits)
English Literature (3 credits)
Speech (3 credits)
Math; MATH 104 or higher (3 credits)
Natural Sciences (4 credits)
Behavioral Science (fulfilled by certificate requirement)
Professional Education Courses – See below
Clinical Experiences and Student Teaching

The Judaic Studies and LAS requirements are identical to the requirements for all
matriculating HTC/Blitstein Institute students.

All candidates will complete the following Professional Education courses:

PSYC 217        Developmental Psychology
or PSYC 267    Adolescent Psychology
ARTS 230        Education Through the Arts
EDUC 241        Health and Safety Education
EDUC 305        Cognitive and Language Development
or EDUC 313    Educational Psychology
EDUC 310        Ethics and Moral Education
EDUC 314        Differentiated Instruction
EDUC 315        Survey of Exceptional Children
EDUC 318        Assessment of Behavior and Learning for Classroom Teacher*
EDUC 319        Diagnosis and Remediation of Learning, Emotional, and Behavior
                        Disorders*
EDUC 327        Methods of Teaching Tanach in Secondary Schools*
or EDUC 328    Methods of Teaching History in Secondary Schools*
EDUC 336        Computers, Applications, and Technology in Education*
EDUC 340        Classroom Management*
EDUC 353        School Law *
EDUC 379        Student Teaching 15 weeks, full time *

*Level II courses

All education courses will require clinical experiences. Candidates must follow all other
teacher Licensure requirements including, but not limited to, the Test of Academic
Proficiency; Application and acceptance to the Department of Education; Dispositions
Assessments; Student Teaching assessments and portfolio.

Curriculum Requirements: HTC Hebrew Teacher Certificate K-8

Hebrew Theological College offers a comprehensive curriculum designed to prepare and
train students to become professionally competent, culturally equipped and religiously
inspired teachers in Hebrew Day Schools and Supplementary Schools (Talmud Torahs).

Completion of the Hebrew Teacher Training program of studies will fulfill the requirements
of the Board of License of the Associated Talmud Torahs of Chicago for employment in its
educational system. A Hebrew Teacher Certificate will be granted upon successful
completion of all requirements. This certificate, granted only upon completion of a
baccalaureate degree, has wide recognition in the United States and Israel. Students may
pursue the Hebrew Teacher Certificate while completing the requirements for the Bachelor
of Arts degree.

Requirements for Hebrew Teacher Certificate

Certification will be granted only to students who meet all of the following requirements:

Completion of the Bachelor of Arts degree:

  • Students who have earned a degree from another institution, with a major in a field
    other than Judaic Studies, must have earned no less than 36 semester hours of college 
    level work in Hebrew and Judaic Studies to be considered as candidates for 
    certification.
  • Successfully pass a proficiency test of oral and written Hebrew or have earned a 3.0 
    grade point average in at least 6 semester hours of advanced courses in the Hebrew 
    Theological College Hebrew Department. 
  • Successfully pass the test of HTC Post-Test of General Judaic Knowledge administered 
    by the Bressler School of Advanced Hebrew Studies. 
  • Professional Education - Students must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of 
    professional education courses, including all courses in Level I Core Curriculum with 
    the exception of EDUC 295 [see below for specifics], and EDUC 319: Diagnosis and 
    Remediation of Learning, Emotional, and Behavior Disorders, EDUC 340: Strategies 
    for Behavior Management in the Classroom, and at least two courses in Methods of 
    Teaching Hebrew and Judaic Studies. 


Clinical Experience - All students seeking Hebrew Teacher Certification must complete a
series of clinical experiences, as delineated in the Department of Education Guidebook.

Student Teaching - Certification is contingent upon completion of 6 semester hours of
Student Teaching, which consists of supervised teaching for a full semester at an approved
Hebrew Day School, Candidates must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 on a
4.0 scale in all professional coursework. In addition, students must obtain department
approval for student teaching. Students are required to attend a weekly student teaching
seminar

Curriculum Requirements: Illinois State Teaching License in Elementary and Special
Education

The Elementary and Special Education programs prepare HTC students to have flexible
skills that enable them to extend beyond traditional roles as classroom teachers, and allow
the students to respond effectively to changing needs in the public and private schools. In
order to guarantee that all Education majors receive the breadth of general education in the
Liberal Arts and Sciences and meet the requirements specified by the NCATE Standards
and Illinois State Board of Education, students who wish to pursue Illinois State Teacher
Licensure in Elementary and Special Education are required to take the following courses,
which include the minimum requirements for graduation with a Bachelor of Arts.

Liberal Arts and Sciences

  • Required coursework in Communication includes oral and written language. Teacher
    candidates must successfully complete English Composition 211, and 3 semester hours 
    in Oral Communication. 
  • A minimum of 36 semester hours are required in Humanities. This includes 3 semester 
    hours in English Literature; 12 semester hours in Bible and Biblical Literature; 12 
    semester hours in Foreign Language and Literature; 6 semester hours in Philosophy; 
    and 3 semester hours in ARTS 230 Education Through the Arts. 
  • Students must acquire a broad-base of knowledge in the areas of Social and Behavioral 
    Sciences through a minimum of 12 semester hours in coursework that includes: 
    Psychology, Political Science, Sociology or Economics, American History (required)
     
    and Non-Western History (required). 
  • Students must demonstrate competency in the Natural Sciences. Elementary Education 
    Majors must take one course in the biological sciences, and one course in the physical 
    sciences. A third course must be an integrated science, emphasizing curriculum and 
    methodology for a diverse population. All courses must have a lab component. Special 
    Education Majors are required to take a lab course in Biological Science or Physical 
    Science, an integrated science, emphasizing curriculum and methodology for a diverse 
    population, and Tests and Measurements. 
  • Education majors must demonstrate a broad-based competency in Mathematics either 
    by fulfilling the HTC math requirement (MATH 104, 105 or higher). 
  • 3 semester hours must be completed in Health and Physical Development. The course 
    emphasizes sensitivity to diversity and perspectives in dealing with issues of health, 
    prevention, and well-being. 


In addition to the General Education requirements provided by the Kanter School of Liberal
Arts and Sciences and the Bressler School of Advanced Hebrew Studies described above,
students who wish to pursue Illinois State Teacher Licensure in Elementary or Special
Education must complete the following Professional Education Core. Most courses are 3
credit except where indicated. According to the IL State Board of Education, no grade lower
than a 'C' in content or professional education coursework may be used for Licensure,
endorsements, or approvals

Professional Education Core

Core Curriculum – Level I
EDUC 200        Principles and Foundations of Education
EDUC 241        Health and Safety Education
EDUC 295        Analysis of Children’s Literature
PHIL 310          Ethics and Moral Education
EDUC 313        Educational Psychology
or EDUC 305   Cognitive and Language Development
EDUC 314        Effective Practices in Differentiated Instruction
EDUC 315        Survey of Exceptional Children
EDUC 336        Computers, Applications, and Technology in Education

Core Curriculum – Level II
EDUC 318        Assessment of Behavior and Learning for Classroom Teacher
EDUC 319        Diagnosis and Remediation of Learning, Emotional, and Behavior
                        Disorders (4)
EDUC 340        Strategies for Behavior Management in the Classroom;
EDUC 353        School Law

Areas of Specialization
Elementary Education

In addition to the professional education core, elementary education majors must complete
four methodology courses:
EDUC 331        Methods of Differentiated Instruction in Language Arts and Writing (3)
EDUC 332        Methods of Teaching Literacy (3)
EDUC 333        Methods of Differentiated Instruction in Mathematics in the Elementary
                        and Middle School (3)
EDUC 334        Methods of Differentiated Instruction in Social Studies in the Elementary
                        and Middle School (3)
EDUC 335        Methods of Differentiated Instruction in Science in the Elementary and
                        Middle School (4)

Elementary Education candidates must also successfully complete EDUC 375, Student
Teaching in an approved elementary school site.

 Special Education - LBS I

In addition to the Level I and Level II core requirements, special education majors must
complete the following courses:

EDUC 316        Assessment of Learning and Behavior (4)
EDUC 317        Characteristics of and Methods of Teaching Students with Developmental
                        Disabilities (4)
EDUC 331        Methods of Differentiated Instruction in Language Arts and Writing (3)
EDUC 332        Methods of Teaching Literacy (3)
EDUC 333        Methods of Differentiated Instruction in Mathematics in the Elementary
                        and Middle School (3)
EDUC 335        Methods of Differentiated Instruction in Science in the Elementary and
                        Middle School (4)

LBS I candidates must also successfully complete EDUC 377 Practicum Special Education–
LBS I in an approved special education site.

Clinical Experiences

All students seeking Illinois State Teacher Licensure in Elementary and Special Education
must complete a series of structured, comprehensive clinical experiences in approved
clinical sites. These hours must be spent observing and working with children in an
approved site, under the supervision of a qualified cooperating teacher. The clinical
experiences are designed and structured by the course instructors to provide exposure to a
wide variety of individual differences, cultural diversity, and educational technology.
Required clinical experiences are incorporated into almost every aspect of the professional
education programs. Clinical experiences are vital to the education experience and
successful competition of coursework is contingent on completing clinicals. Candidates are
expected to attend all extension activities, including field trips, professional development, or
seminars as scheduled by the Clinical Experiences Coordinator. Clinical experiences must
be completed before the end of each semester. Students must complete a background check
before beginning their Clinical Experiences and comply with the procedures established by
partner districts. Information about background check locations can be found at
www.accuratebiometrics.com.

Three types of clinical experiences are required.

Field Experiences: Observations, small group activities, and work with individual students.

Prepracticum Internships: Planning and implementing differentiated lessons, microteaching,
model lessons and assessment.

Student Teaching and Practicum are collaberatively designed experiences that require a full-
time, full-semester of teaching in an approved site, under the supervision of a master teacher.
Candidates are required by law to clear a TB test before working in a school. The candidate
is responsible for keeping the results of the test, and providing it to the school district if it is
required. 

Candidates must be admitted to the Department of Education prior to conducting
prepracticum internships, student teaching, and practicum. Departmental Approval is
required for Student Teaching or Practicum.


Illinois State Required Exams

In addition to the Test of Basic Skills, all teacher candidates must take and pass the
following State exams prior to being recommended for Licensure:

Elementary Education:
*Content Area Exam – Elementary Education
Assessment of Professional Teaching (APT) K-9

Special Education:
*Content Area Exam – LBS I
Assessment of Professional Teaching (APT) K-12
Special Education General Curriculum Test

* Candidates must successfully pass the content area exam prior to student teaching.
Candidates who have fulfilled the requirements for an LBS I endorsement on their
elementary education certificate must take the LBS I exam in addition to the Elementary
Education Content Area exam. The candidates must take the APT K-12 in place of the APT
K-9. Test requirements may be subject to change by the ISBE. Candidates who qualify for
endorsements must apply for the endorsement directly to ISBE. Candidates must pass their
content area tests before student teaching.

Effective September 1, 2015, the State will require all candidates for licensure in
Elementary or Special Education (LBS I) must pass the edTPA, an evidenced-based
assessment of teacher effectiveness. This assessment will be phased into the Education
programs in the 2013-2014 academic year. 

Information about all examinations, registration materials, and test bulletins are available in
the office of the Department of Education. Candidates must follow the requirements and
procedures outlined by ISBE and keep informed about changing policies and rules.
Candidates keep current by going to ISBE’s website at www.isbe.net and through regular
advising sessions in the Department of Education.

Alignment with Professional, State and Institutional Standards

In the organization, structure and practices of the unit, the Department of Education adheres
to the National Council for Accreditation of Teachers (NCATE) standards as adopted by the
Illinois State Board of Education. The Illinois Content Area Standards for Educators are
addressed in collaboration with the Kanter School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, for both
general education and professional preparation courses. The Interstate New Teacher
Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) and Illinois Professional Teaching
Standards (IPTS) are reflected in the assessment system of the Department of Education, as
well as in the coursework and clinical experiences in both the elementary and special
education programs.

The elementary and special education programs of the Department of Education are aligned
with the following State standards:

  • Illinois Professional Teaching Standards
  • Illinois Content Area Standards
  • Illinois Core Language Arts Standards
  • Illinois Core Technology Standards


Additionally, the LBS I program is aligned with the:

  • Core Standards for Special Educators
  • General Curriculum Standards for Special Education
  • Council for Exceptional Children


These standards are reflected in candidate assessments, electronic portfolios, clinical
experiences assessments, dispositions assessments, as well as through the Illinois Licensure
Testing System (ICTS) Test of Academic Proficiency, Content Area Tests, and the
Assessment of Professional Teaching. For candidates in special education, these standards
are also reflected in the Special Education General Curriculum Test.

The institutional standards are delineated in the Department of Education goals and
outcomes, and reflect the candidate as a critical thinker, effective communicator, proactive
educator, and moral practitioner. In addition, candidate proficiencies are assessed at a series
of five benchmarks: upon admission to the institution, admission to the Department of
Education, during clinical experiences and methods courses, during student teaching, and at
the completion of student teaching.

State of Illinois Institutional Report
Hebrew Theological College Department of Education
October 2011

Teacher Preparation Programs: Hebrew Theological College (HTC) offers programs
leading to a Bachelor of Arts with an additional major in education. HTC programs lead to
State Teaching Licenses in Elementary Education and Special Education in the areas of
Learning Behavior Specialist I.

Student Characteristics: Students pursuing an additional major in education are mostly
between the ages of 19-25, with some returning professionals ages 30 and above. 75% of the
students are Illinois residents and 67% are full-time.

Admission Policies for the Department of Education: Admission Policies for the
Department of Education can be found on page 38.

Teacher Education Vision: To provide the highest quality professional preparation to our
students to help them reach their fullest potential as educators and to instill in them a
lifetime love of learning.
To train each teacher to be an Effective Communicator, Critical Thinker, Proactive Educator
and Moral Practitioner.

Best Practices:
1.        Comprehensive structured clinical experiences integrated in the teacher preparation
           program.
2.        Emphasis on a proactive approach to classroom management and teaching.
3.        Focus on critical thinking and effective communication skills.
4.        Integration of technology into the curriculum.

Notable Features and Accomplishments:
1.        Establishment of Blitstein Institute Curriculum Library.
2.        Received grants for assistive technology and for new local area network.
3.        New computer lab.
4.        Faculty implemented comprehensive student review committee to assess knowledge,
           skills, and dispositions of teacher candidates.
5.        Implementation of standards-based electronic portfolios for teacher candidates.
6.        Successful completion of ISBE 5th year review.
7.        Almost 100% job placement for teacher graduates.
8.        Students consistently scoring above national norms on tests of basic skills and
           Licensure subject areas, as well as the Assessment for Professional Teaching.

The Department of Education is in the process of a program redesign to ensure that all
courses, assessments, and clinical experiences are aligned with the new Illinois Professional
Teaching Standards,